Georgia Child Support Calculator – 2019

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If you are applying for child support or you are a non-custodial parent trying to figure out how much child support you are likely to pay, we can help. Our Georgia Child Support Calculator will walk you through how to calculate child support payments in Georgia. The calculator will estimate your monthly child support payment based on Georgia’s child support guidelines.

"Georgia Child Support Calculator"

This post will cover:

  • Georgia Child Support Law
  • How to Calculate Child Support Payment in Georgia
  • Georgia Child Support Calculator – Example
  • Georgia Basic Child Support Obligation Table

Georgia Child Support Law

Until Jan. 1, 2007, the Georgia Division of Family & Children Services (Georgia DFCS) calculated child support based solely on the income of the non-custodial parent. The child support payment was determined as a percentage range depending on the number of children subject to the order.

The Georgia child support law was changed on Jan. 1, 2007. The new law looks at many factors, other than the gross income of the non-custodial parent.

The new way of calculating child support payment in Georgia is called “Income Shares Model”. According to this model, both parents share equal responsibility in providing for the financial needs of their children.

Each parent is responsible for a percentage of the appropriate amount listed in the Georgia Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations.

How to Calculate Child Support Payment in Georgia

The first step in calculating child support in Georgia is to determine each parent’s presumptive child support obligation. This is done by figuring out the gross income of each parent.

For the purposes of child support calculation, gross income includes:

salary, wages, commissions, self-employment income, bonuses, overtime pay, severance pay, pension and retirement income, interest income, dividend income, trust income, capital gains, Social Security disability payments, worker’s compensation benefits, unemployment benefits, judgments from personal injury claims or other civil cases, gifts, prizes, and any other sources of income.

Once you have determined the gross income for both parents, both parent’s monthly income is added together to determine the combined monthly income earned by both parents.

The next step is to use the Georgia Basic Child Support Obligation (BCSO) table to determine the combined basic support obligation. The BCSO defines a base monthly amount for the number of children.

After the combined basic child support obligation is determined, that amount must be divided proportionally between the parents, depending on the percentage of each parent’s contribution to the combined income amount.

Georgia Child Support Calculator – Example

To help you calculate child support payment in Georgia, we are going to use an example. The example involves one child. The Mother, the custodial parent makes $4,000 a month and the Father, the non-custodial parent makes $6,000 a month.

Here is to calculate child support payments using the example above.

Step 1: Determine Combined Gross Income

The first step in calculating Georgia child support payment is to combine the adjusted gross monthly income for both parents and then determining the percentage of the total that each parent contributes.

In the example above, the Mother has an adjusted gross income of $4,000 a month and the father has an adjusted gross income of $6,000 a month.

Their combined adjusted gross income is $10,000 ($4,000 plus $6,000). In this example, the Mother makes 40% of the total monthly income ($4,000 of $10,000), and Father makes 60% of the total monthly income ($6,000 of $10,000).

Step 2: Use the BCSO Table to Determine Combined Payment

The second step involves using the Georgia Basic Child Support Obligation table to determine the combined monthly child support obligation. Click here to see the table for 2019.

To determine the combined child support obligation, scroll down the “Combined Adjusted Gross Income” column on the left until you find $10,000″. Then since there is only one child, the combined child support obligation for both parents is $1,259 per month.

Step 3 -Determine Child Support Payment for Non-Custodial Parent

According to the BCSO Table, for one child, the combined child support amount is $1,259 per month. The Mother’s obligation is 40% of $1,259 per month (0.4x $1,259) which is $499.60.

The father’s obligation is 60% of $1,259 per month (0.6x $1,259) which is $749.40.

This is not necessarily the amount of child support which is due each month. The factors below will be used to further adjust the BCSO number.

Step 4 – Adjustments to BCSO Amount

Once you determine the child support amount each parent must pay based on the BCSO, the next step is to consider adjustments for certain special situations or other payments a parent is making on behalf of the minor child or children who will benefit from the child support obligation.

Adjustments may be made for:

  • Income hardship
  • Adjustments for Other Expenses
  • Amount of Parenting Time
  • A judges override (acceptable under Georgia Law)

Georgia Child Support Calculator 2019

Now that you understand how Georgia Child Support payments are calculated, we advise you to use the Georgia Online Child Support Calculator found on the Georgia Child Support Commission’s website.

This is the most accurate tool for calculating child support payment in Georgia. Click here to be taken there.

Georgia Basic Child Support Obligation Table

Here is the Georgia Basic Child Support Obligation table for your convenience. The table shows combined adjusted gross income for both parents on the left and the combined child support payable by both parents according to the number of children.

We have provided a condensed version of the BCSO table below, in increments of $500, up to a combined income of $20,000.

There are two tables below. Table one is for combined income between $800 – $10,000. Table two is for combined income between $10,000 – $20,000. Both have income increments of $500.

To see our full table for income up to $20,000, click here. For the entire BCSO list provided by the Georgia DHS (Department of Human Resources), click here.

BCSO Table – Income $800 – $10,000

"Georgia Child Support Calculator - BCSO Table 1"

BCSO Table – Income $10,000 – $20,000

"Georgia Child Support Calculator - BCSO Table 2"

If you have any questions about how to calculate Georgia Child Support, you can ask us in the comments section below.

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